1. Skip to Menu
  2. Skip to Content
  3. Skip to Footer>

Articles

all

In 2014 the British Stainless Steel Association (BSSA) has selected 50 grades to illustrate the many useful properties of stainless steel. The basis for the selection is the frequency with which a grade appears in the Stainless Steel Advisory Services Enquiry Database.

 

What should the first grade be? 

 

#

1

304/304L 1.4301/1.4307 S30400/S30403

    Domestic sink                                                                 

     Food and drink processing

 

Not surprisingly, 304 (1.4301) and its variants are the most common grades in the SSAS database. This reflects the market as a whole.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr 8% Ni (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

Good corrosion resistance

Good weldability

Excellent ductility giving stretch formability in pressings

Hygienic surfaces

Work hardening for spring properties

Ease of manufacture at the steel mill

This combination of properties leads to the grade being used for a wide range of applications including:

Sinks, pots and pans, catering surfaces, architectural cladding, handrails, food processing, water treatment, pressure vessels, transport containers, surgical instruments, building support products, refrigeration equipment, watch cases, automotive trim, street furniture, anaerobic digestion, chemical plant, sanitaryware.

This is merely a sample of the applications for 304/304L (1.4301/1.4307). Despite the competition from grades with a similar corrosion resistance, this grade is likely to continue to form the backbone of the stainless steel market for some years to come.

 

 

#

2

316/316L 1.4401/1.4404 S31600/S31603

    Offshore Oil and Gas                             

 Pharmaceutical Isolator   

 

Grade 316 (1.4401) is the second in this series of articles about stainless steel grades. It is the most common grade which highlights the benefits of molybdenum (Mo).

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr 10% Ni 2% Mo (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

Mo enhances the corrosion resistance of stainless steel even in relatively small amounts. 1% of Mo is worth about 3% of Cr in terms of corrosion resistance.

In environments where 304 (1.4301) is found to be inadequate, 316 (1.4401) is the natural first grade to be considered. Typical environments where 316 (1.4401) is used are high chloride (saline, coastal), heavy urban, acidic, high temperature solutions. Like all austenitic stainless steels, 316 (1.4401) has good welding and forming characteristics.

Typical applications which demonstrate the improved corrosion resistance of 316(1.4401) include:

Pharmaceutical plant, chemical processing, offshore oil and gas platform topside equipment, architectural applications in urban and coastal conditions, food processing, water treatment, pressure vessels, transport containers, swimming pool fittings and fixtures, marine structures, yacht fittings, laboratory equipment, heat exchangers.

316 (1.4401) will continue to be an important grade of stainless steel in the more demanding applications for many years to come.

 

#

3

430 1.4016 S43000

    Washing Machine Drum

    Extractor Unit

 

Grade 430 (1.4016) is the most common ferritic stainless steel grade in sheet form. 

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•    Fair corrosion resistance
•    Fair weldability (in thin sections)
•    Excellent deep drawing properties
•    Cost effectiveness due to absence of nickel
•    Hygienic surfaces
•    Magnetic
•    Thermal expansion comparable to carbon steel

Indoor conditions are usually compatible with the use of 430 (1.4016). Mild chemicals such as detergents and cleaning fluids are safe to use with this grade.

Typical applications include:

Washing machine drums, cutlery, kitchen utensils, catering equipment, microwave oven liners, kick plates, lifts, induction heated pots and pans, cooker hobs, air extraction units, automotive trim, hose clamps, window hinges. 430 (1.4016) is a cost-effective material in many mild environments and will continue to be so for many years.

 

 

 

#

4

2205 Duplex 1.4462 S31803/S32205

 

Beckton Desalination Plant             

 

Fasteners for Pumps and Valves

2205 Duplex is a generic term for the most common of the duplex stainless steels. It has become the grade of choice where 316/316L does not have adequate corrosion resistance.

Approximate Composition – 22% Cr 5% Ni 3% Mo 0.15% N (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics: 

•    Design strength 2 times that of standard austenitic grades 

•    Excellent pitting and crevice corrosion resistance 

•    Excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking 

•    Good weldability  

•    Moderate impact toughness down to minus 80°C

Many chemical and marine processes operate in very aggressive conditions. These push the more familiar grades such as 316/316L (1.4401/1.4404) beyond their limits. 2205 Duplex (1.4462) provides a significant improvement in corrosion resistance. The increased strength can also lead to a reduction in section thickness which means that the overall cost can be comparable to that of 316/316L. Resistance to stress corrosion cracking is particularly important in chemical and food processing above 50°C. Although weldability is good, fabricators need to be trained in the specific parameters required to produce sound welds.

Typical applications include:

Offshore oil and gas, chemical processing, desalination plant, pulp and paper, sculptures in coastal locations, brewing, 

food processing, bridges, tensioning systems, nuclear reprocessing, tunnel infrastructure, chemical tanker ships.

2205 Duplex (1.4462) is the natural choice for more aggressive environments.

 

#

5

420 1.4021/1.4028/1.4031/1.4034 S42000

    Bearings

    Surgical Instruments

 

Grade 420 is a “descendant” of the martensitic grade which was invented by Harry Brearley in Sheffield in 1913. It is a hardenable stainless steel used for its basic corrosion resistance, high strength and wear resistance.

Approximate Composition – 12% Cr (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards). The EN system defines several grades which fit into 420 by narrow ranges of carbon content whilst the ASTM system defines 420 with 0.15% minimum carbon only.

This grade combines the following characteristics: 

•    Basic corrosion resistance 

•    High hardness and strength 

•    Controlled balance of mechanical properties by hardening and tempering 

•    High wear resistance 

•    Cost effectiveness due to low chromium content and absence of nickel 

•    Magnetic 

•    Thermal expansion comparable to carbon steel 

•    Not easy to weld

Typical applications include:

Cutlery blades, solids handling, surgical instruments, plastic moulding, drive shafts, bearings, gears, springs, conveying equipment, cargo handling, tools, seaweed driers.

420 is a great choice for basic corrosion resistance, good strength and wear resistance.

 

#

6

431 1.4057 S43100  S80 (aerospace grade)

   Hydraulic Ram

    Prop Shaft for Motor Boat

 

Grade 431 (1.4057) is the “all round” engineering martensitic stainless steel, combining fair corrosion resistance with good strength and impact toughness.

Approximate Composition – 15% Cr 2% Ni (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards). “Old” BS 970 431S29 still used for its higher Ni content.

This grade combines the following characteristics: 

•    Fair corrosion resistance (better than 420) 

•    High hardness and strength 

•    Wear resistance 

•    Controlled balance of mechanical properties by hardening and tempering 

•    Improved toughness compared to 420 due to lower carbon and nickel addition 

•    Magnetic 

•    Not easy to weld 

431 has one of the best combinations of corrosion resistance, high strength and good impact toughness of all the stainless steels. This accounts for its popularity in a wide range of engineering applications which include: 

Drive shafts, propeller shafts, bearings, gears, hydraulic rams, valve stems, actuators, satellite parts, conveyor drive systems, hi-fi equipment stands, packaging machinery, crane pins, seat dampers for boats, mixing blades, golf clubs.

431 offers a cost-effective solution in many challenging engineering applications.

 

#

7

Superduplex 1.4410/1.4501/1.4507 S32750/S32760/S32550

   Cable Protection Fasteners  

 

   Filtration Screens from Wedge Wire

Superduplex is a generic term covering a range of highly alloyed grades developed for use in highly aggressive conditions, notably in sea water.

Approximate Composition – 25% Cr 7% Ni 3.5% Mo 0.25% N (nitrogen) plus optional Cu (copper) and W (tungsten). (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

Excellent pitting and crevice corrosion resistance (PREN > 40)

Excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance

Good yield strength (550 MPa minimum)

Good impact toughness down to minus 50°C

Cu bearing grades excellent resistance to sulphuric acid

Knowledge required to maintain properties in fabrication

The superduplex grades are used in extremely aggressive conditions notably in seawater and high chloride or acidic chemical processes. Their complex metallurgy means that the process parameters must be kept within narrow ranges to maintain the required microstructure, corrosion resistance and impact toughness. This is especially true in welding. Therefore, fabricators require relevant training and approvals to work effectively with this material.

Applications include:

Oil and gas subsea, desalination, chemical processing, pulp and paper, valves, pumps etc. 

Superduplex grades provide a combination of high corrosion resistance and strength in very aggressive conditions.

 

#

8

1.4003 S40977

  Dennis Eagle Elite 2 RefuseVehicle   

                                                     

  Painted Electrical Enclosure                                                   

Developed originally as 3CR12 in South Africa, 1.4003 is a low cost stainless steel used as a cost effective substitute 

for galvanised and painted carbon steels. It is sometimes termed a “utility ferritic” grade. 

Approximate Composition – 11% Cr 0.5% Ni (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics: 

•    Basic corrosion resistance (lowest grade classed as stainless steel) 

•    Composition balanced to give good weldability in thick sections in contrast to other ferritic grades 

•    Moderate impact toughness  

•    Moderate wear resistance 

•    Low cost 

Many applications require some degree of corrosion resistance without needing to maintain an aesthetic appearance. The key property is to maintain section thickness rather than “looking the part”. The grade was originally developed to serve the mining industry in South Africa where large amounts were used for handling ores in the form of wagons,   hoppers and chutes. The basic corrosion resistance, wear resistance, weldability and low cost provided a winning combination. In some applications the steel is painted to provide additional corrosion resistance.

Applications have expanded to a wide range since the initial development to include:

Coach frames, minibus chassis, sugar beet handling, malting vessels, electrical enclosures, fuel tanks, chimneys, refuse vehicles, fertiliser storage, rail wagons, conveying equipment for dry material, lintels, laboratory work surfaces 1.4003 is the lowest cost stainless steel. Provided aesthetic appearance is not an issue, it provides a good solution. 

 

#

9

6% Mo 1.4529/1.4547 N08926/S31254

   Internal pumps and valves for submarines   

                                               

    Desalination plant pipework

 

“6% Mo” is a generic term for several highly alloyed austenitic grades. They have been developed for highly aggressive seawater and chemical processing environments.

Approximate Composition – 20% Cr, 18-24% Ni, 6% Mo, 0.2% N plus Cu (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•    Excellent pitting and crevice corrosion resistance (PREN > 40, comparable to superduplex

•    Excellent resistance to strong acids 

•    Excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance 

•    Approved for use for structural components in swimming pools 

•    Higher yield strength than standard austenitic stainless steels 

•    Good impact toughness at sub-zero temperatures (better than superduplex)  

•    Improved formability compared to superduplex 

•    Careful control of welding parameters required 

•    Viable alternative to expensive nickel base alloys

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Pulp and paper, desalination, chemical processing, chemical tanker ships, heat exchangers, metal refining, flue gas desulphurisation (FGD), swimming pool structural components, offshore oil and gas, submarines, aggressive food processing e.g. soy sauce, condenser tubing.

6% Mo grades are at the top end of the stainless steel “spectrum” giving excellent service in very aggressive environments.

 

#

10

310 1.4845 S31008

    Heat Treatment Basket 

 

   Fasteners for Furnace Linings

 

310 is the “workhorse” high temperature steel. Its fully austenitic structure allows it to double as a non-magnetic stainless steel at normal temperatures.

Approximate Composition – 25% Cr 20% Ni (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•    Excellent oxidation resistance to 1050°C

•    Good carburisation resistance

•    Good sulphidation resistance

•    Good resistance to molten metals

•    Low magnetic permeability

310 is the most common grade of heat resistant stainless steel. It is the most likely heat resistant grade to be stocked in a wide range of product forms and will cope with a wide range of high temperature conditions. The high Cr (25%) contributes to the general “strength” of the passive layer. The high Ni (20%) reduces the differential in thermal expansion between the passive layer and the base metal, thereby increasing resistance to spalling in thermal cycling conditions.

The high Ni content leads to a fully austenitic structure which gives a very low magnetic response. The high alloy content also gives a high resistance to martensite formation on cold working. Therefore, 310 is also used in specialised non-magnetic applications. It is more widely available than the “correct” non-magnetic grades like 304LN and 316LN.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Heat treatment furnaces and accessories, power generation, cement production, burners, metal sintering, waste incineration, refractory anchors, glass making, scientific instruments.

 

#

11

17-4 PH 630 1.4542 S17400

Post Tensioning Bar              

   Load Cell

 

Grade 17-4 PH (1.4542) is perhaps the most common example of the precipitation hardening stainless grades. It combines good corrosion resistance with high strength and good impact toughness.

Approximate Composition – 16% Cr, 4% Ni, 4% Cu plus Nb (niobium) (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•    Good corrosion resistance (just below that of 304) 

•    High hardness and strength 

•    Controlled balance of mechanical properties by ageing (precipitation hardening) 

•    Improved toughness compared to 431 including use at sub-zero temperatures for the softer conditions 

•    Magnetic 

•    Thermal expansion comparable to carbon steel 

•    Easier to weld than martensitic grades like 420 and 431 

17-4 PH develops its high strength from the precipitation of copper particles in its martensitic matrix. It comes in various conditions denoted by H plus ageing temperature in °F, for example H900, H1025 etc. The higher the ageing temperature, the lower is the strength and the higher are the ductility and toughness. The minimum 0.2% PS varies from 520 MPa to 1170 MPa depending on the condition.  The combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance finds uses in:

Drive shafts, bearings, gears, hydraulic rams, valve stems, load cells, bridge bearings, tensioning systems, golf clubs, quick release pins, fasteners, aerospace, medical devices, food processing, conveying equipment, 17-4 PH is the natural choice of high strength, corrosion resistant steel particularly where standard martensitic grades like 431 aren’t quite good enough.

 

#

12

Lean Duplex 1.4062/1.4162/1.4362/1.4482/1.4662 S32202/S32101/S32304/S32001/S82441

   Footbridge       

 

   Masonry Support Anchors

                                                

Lean Duplex is a generic term covering a range of stainless steel grades which are designed to have corrosion resistance in the spectrum of 304 to 316 or slightly beyond but with at least twice the design strength at lower cost.

Approximate Composition – 20-24% Cr, 1.0-4.0% Ni, low Mo 0.1-0.25% plus N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Pitting and crevice corrosion resistance in range of 304 to just above 316

• Good stress corrosion cracking resistance

• Good yield strength (450 MPa minimum up to 550 MPa). 2-2.5 times design strength of 304/316

• Good impact toughness to minus 50ºC

• Good weldability. Parameters less critical than standard duplex and superduplex grades

• Cost effectiveness due to low alloy content especially Ni and Mo

• Moderate formability. Higher power required due to higher strength. Special formability grades being developed

Lean duplex grades offer a cost effective alternative to standard austenitic grades like 304/304L and 316/316L. With the higher design strength, section thickness can often be reduced leading to significant weight and cost reduction. Each grade in this category should be evaluated on its own merits.

Applications include:

Storage vessels, domestic hot water tanks, structural sections, lintels, reinforcing bar, bridges, building support products.

 

#

13

XM-19 1.3964 (W Nr) S20910

   Yacht Rigging              

   Valves                       

 

XM-19, often known by its AK Steel brand name of Nitronic 50®, is a high strength nitrogen-bearing austenitic stainless steel. It has superior corrosion resistance and strength compared to 316/316L.

Approximate Composition – 21% Cr, 5.0% Mn, 12.0% Ni, 2.0% Mo, 0.3% N plus Nb and V (vanadium). Grade 1.3964 does not appear officially in the EN system but is found in SEW 390 as Werkstoff Nummer (W Nr) 1.3964.

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Better pitting and crevice corrosion resistance than 316/316L and 317L depending on  the environment

• Good yield strength (415 MPa minimum) in solution annealed condition

• Special hot working processes allow yield strength of up to 800 MPa dependent on section size

• Extremely high strength by cold drawing

• Impact toughness down to cryogenic temperatures. Advantage over high strength duplex grades

• Use at up to 580°C. Advantage over duplex grades (300°C maximum)

• Non-magnetic even with high levels of cold work

• Difficult to machine due to high hardness

XM-19 offers an excellent combination of high strength and corrosion resistance. Its main advantage over competitive materials like duplex grades is its much wider band of useful temperatures both at the high and low end of the spectrum. Increased solubility of nitrogen for high strength is achieved with the high manganese content. Its non-magnetic properties are vital in specialist applications like submarine hulls and minesweepers.

Applications include:

Offshore oil and gas connectors and couplings, chemical storage vessels, marine drive shafts, pump shafts, valves, yacht rigging, submarine hulls.

 

#

14

409 1.4512 S40900

Exhaust Components

Catalytic Converter

 

409 is a low cost ferritic stainless steel. Its dominant use is in vehicle exhaust systems, so much so that it is often referred to as “muffler” grade.

Approximate Composition – 11% Cr plus Ti (titanium). (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Basic corrosion and oxidation resistance

• Composition balanced for optimum formability 

• Weldable only in thin sections due to fully ferritic structure

• Low cost and limited cost variation due to low alloy content

Automotive exhaust systems have to withstand aggressive conditions from high temperatures at the manifold end, sulphuric acid condensate and de-icing salt. Given the severity of these conditions, it can seem surprising that the 11% Cr 409 grade has met the challenge for many years. Exhaust components are also required to be bent, expanded and pressed into all sorts of convoluted shapes. The ability of a ferritic steel to meet these formability requirements is little short of amazing.

Other applications include:

Heat exchangers, gas boilers, fuel filters.

 

#

15

Stabilised Austenitics 321/347 1.4541/1.4550 S32100/S34700

    A380 Airbus            

   Heat Exchangers

                                       

The stabilised austenitic grades 321 and 347 are similar to 304 but with Ti or Nb to improve intergranular corrosion resistance. They also have superior high temperature mechanical properties compared to 304/304L.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr, 9% Ni plus Ti (titanium) or Nb (niobium). (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Similar pitting corrosion resistance to 304L

• Intergranular corrosion resistance equal to 304L 

• Improved high temperature 0.2% proof strength compared to 304L. 20% higher at 100°C, 45% higher at 550°C

• Improved creep strength compared to 304L

• Weldability equal to 304L

• Difficult to achieve good polished finish due to carbides in the microstructure

In the early phase of the development of austenitic stainless steels like 304, the carbon content was high around 0.1%. On welding, it was found that the chromium reacted with the carbon to produce chromium carbide. This removes chromium from the matrix of the steel and effectively weakens the passive film near to the weld leading to corrosion, known as “weld decay”. It was found that adding titanium (321) or niobium (347) solved this problem by preferentially combining with the carbon leaving the chromium to do its job of forming the passive layer. With the advent of low cost steelmaking processes like AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) and VOD (vacuum oxygen decarburisation), low carbon grades like 304L, with a maximum carbon content of 0.030%, have virtually eliminated intergranular corrosion. 321 and 347 are now mainly used for their improved high temperature properties compared to 304L.

Applications include:

Heat exchangers, gas boilers, aerospace, exhaust systems, process plant, element tubing, power generation, rocket engine parts.

 

#

16

904L 1.4539 N08904

   Sulphuric Acid Plant

  Chimney Liners

 

904L was originally developed for sulphuric acid service, particularly in concentrations from 20% to 85%. Its high chromium and molybdenum also makes it more resistant to pitting corrosion than standard grades such as 316/316L.

Approximate Composition – 20% Cr, 25% Ni, 4.0% Mo, 1.5% Cu plus N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•  Excellent resistance to sulphuric acid across the complete concentration range

•  Good pitting and crevice corrosion resistance (PREN ~ 32 , comparable to 2205 duplex)

•  Excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance

•  Good impact toughness at sub-zero temperatures (better than duplex) 

•  Improved formability compared to duplex

•  Non-magnetic. Fully austenitic and very resistant to martensitic transformation

•  Good weldability but care is needed to avoid solidification cracking

904L is a good example of the development of an alloy for a specific purpose. Sulphuric acid is one of the most common basic chemicals. Chemical plants require the storage and transport of this acid at a range of concentrations. In dilute acid, up to about 20%, and in concentrated acid greater than 85%, grade 316L can reasonably be used at ambient temperature. 904L “plugs the gap” in between and reduces the corrosion rate compared to 316L at low and medium concentrations. It achieves this by using the combined effects of chromium, nickel, molybdenum and copper.

The high chromium and molybdenum contents also give a good resistance to chloride pitting and crevice corrosion, comparable to 2205 duplex. This is particularly useful when 2205 duplex is ruled out on grounds of sub-zero impact toughness, formability, service above 300 deg C or magnetic properties.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Pulp and paper, chemical processing, heat exchangers, flue gas desulphurisation (FGD), offshore oil and gas, food processing, chimney liners.

904L is an excellent choice for sulphuric acid and other aggressive environments.

 

#

17

304LN 1.4311 S30453

MRI Scanner          Courtesy of Siemens

 

    Cryogenic Portable Tank Container

                                               

304LN is used where an extremely low level of magnetic permeability is required. This derives from its high nitrogen content.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr, 9% Ni, 0.15% N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Moderate pitting and crevice corrosion resistance 

• Excellent impact toughness at sub-zero temperatures

• Higher 0.2% PS than 304L

• Non-magnetic. Very low ferrite level and very resistant to martensitic transformation. Relative magnetic permeability < 1.005

• Good weldability. Care needed to avoid solidification cracking

304LN was originally developed as a higher strength version of 304L using nitrogen. However, the increase in strength is only modest and duplex grades are now mostly used for this purpose. The grade is now used in specialised applications where a very low magnetic response is needed. In standard 304L, a typical level of relative magnetic permeability is around 1.05-1.1 due to small amounts of ferrite in the austenitic structure. A completely non-magnetic material would have a value of 1.0. 304LN can achieve a maximum value of around 1.005, which is the lowest practical level of any steel grade. It is also very resistant to transformation to the magnetic martensitic phase which can occur on forming or cooling to very low temperatures. Therefore, its main uses are in specialised equipment where magnetic “interference” needs to be avoided and/or for use in cryogenic equipment.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, reinforcing bar for structures surrounding MRI scanners, pressure vessels, cryogenic applications.

304LN is the archetypal non-magnetic grade.

 

#

18

430F 1.4105 S43020

   Anti-Lock Brake System

   Solenoid Valve

 

430F is used where a high level of magnetic permeability is required. This derives from its fully ferritic structure. Its high level of machinability allows volume throughput of components.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 0.15% minimum S (sulphur) (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Fair pitting and crevice corrosion resistance 

• “Soft” magnetic properties. Low coercivity giving reversibly magnetic properties in electromagnetic devices

• High magnetic permeability

• Excellent machinability 

430F is the most common stainless steel grade used for electromagnetic devices. Although its magnetic properties are not as good as the iron-silicon alloys, where corrosion resistance is required, it provides an excellent combination of properties. The processing of the grade is also important to ensure the optimum microstructure. The test certificate includes details of the magnetic properties.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Magnetic cores, solenoid valves, relays, fuel injection systems, anti-lock braking systems, electromagnetic pumps.

 

#

19

303 1.4305 S30300

   Machine Tool Probe Sensor Housing

                                      

   Machine Tool Probe Sensor Housing

                                       

303 is the most common “free-machining” grade using sulphur to produce sulphides allowing easier chip-breaking during machining. Basically it is 304 with sulphur.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 8% Ni, 0.15% minimum S (sulphur) (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Fair pitting corrosion resistance but significantly lower than 304. 

• Improved machinability compared to 304. Machinability index 60% improvement compared to 304

• Poor weldability

• Higher leaching rates of Cr and Ni than normal austenitic stainless steels

303 is a basic stainless steel where high productivity is required. Normally, austenitic stainless steels like 304 are difficult to machine. The high work hardening rate of austenitic stainless steels produces greater tool wear and a tendency to produce “stringy” chips during machining. The situation is made worse by the lower thermal conductivity and higher thermal expansion of these steels.

303 uses sulphur (0.15/0.35%) to produce a large number of manganese sulphide inclusions. These inclusions allow increased speeds and reduced tool wear.

The disadvantages of sulphide inclusions are reduced corrosion resistance, poor weldability and greater propensity to leach chromium and nickel ions in contact with aqueous fluids. The last item means that 303 is not authorised to be used in contact with drinking water nor for jewellery. Nevertheless, 303 is used in many applications where basic corrosion resistance is required.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Threaded fasteners, shafts, valve bodies, precision measurement devices, pneumatic manifolds.

 

#

20

301 1.4310 S30100

   Springs

                                        

   Gripple Wire Joiner

                                             

301 is a low nickel, higher carbon variant of 304. Its dominant purpose is to increase the work hardening capability of this austenitic grade of stainless steel to produce very high strength thin strip and wire.

Approximate Composition – 16.5% Cr, 7% Ni, 0.07% C (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good pitting corrosion resistance but slightly lower than 304 due to lower Cr

• Very high work hardening rate leading to very high strength. Minimum UTS of 1900 MPa possible compared to 1300 • MPa for 304 (1.4301) in the EN standards for springs

• Work hardening producing high level of magnetic response

• Higher carbon leading to greater susceptibility to intergranular corrosion

The high work hardening rate of 301 allows it to be used for a wide range of applications where “springiness” is the primary requirement. The degree of “springiness” varies with the amount of cold rolling for strip or cold drawing for wire products. In the EN spring steel standards, the cold worked conditions are designated in the form +C700 up to +C1900 where the number stands for the minimum UTS in MPa. The ASTM system uses designations such as ¼ hard, ½ hard, ¾ hard and full hard, which cover the range of minimum UTS from 860 to 1275 MPa for grade 301.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Springs, banding, clamps, clips, airframe sections, roll formed sections, wire mesh, seat belts, push feed systems, sash  windows.

 

#

21

201 1.4372 S20100

   Sink

   Pots and Pans

 

201 is typical of the 200 series of stainless steels. These steels use manganese to replace nickel in austenitic stainless steels, mainly in order to make them lower cost. 201 is broadly similar to 304 for corrosion resistance but with some important differences in mechanical properties.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 6.0% Mn, 4.5% Ni, 0.10% N. (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good pitting and crevice corrosion resistance similar to 304

• Higher strength than 304. 350 MPa minimum 0.2% PS compared to 230 MPa for 304

• Higher work hardening rate than 304 

• High manganese leads to greater refractory erosion in melting shops

201 is a typical austenitic manganese bearing stainless steel. The 200 series steels vary greatly from one region to another. There is a very large market in India and China for kitchen utensils and catering equipment. This is mainly due to the scarcity of nickel in those countries. The USA also has a relatively high usage. In contrast, Europe has a much lower usage, preferring the nickel bearing 300 series. Although 201 and 304 are comparable in corrosion resistance, potential substitution should be carefully considered particularly in the area of forming.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Pots and pans, sinks, catering equipment, banding, automotive trim, shipping containers, air bags, window channel spacers.

 

#

22

S21800

Ball Valve

Bridge Bearing

 

21800, often known by its AK Steel brand name of Nitronic 60®, is a wear resistant nitrogen-bearing austenitic stainless steel. It has superior corrosion resistance to 316L.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 8.0% Mn, 4.0% Si, 8.0% Ni, 0.15% N. There is no equivalent in the EN system.

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good pitting and crevice corrosion resistance (better than 316L) based on a wide range of applications, despite its low Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PREN)

• High wear resistance. Weight loss reduced by 80% compared to 304 in abrasion test

• Cavitation erosion resistance better than standard austenitic and duplex grades

• Excellent galling resistance in contact with itself and other stainless steels

• 0.2% PS 50% higher than standard austenitic grades 304 and 316 in annealed condition

• High work hardening rate allows 0.2% PS of 600 MPa minimum by cold drawing

• Good weldability

• More difficult to machine than standard austenitic grades due to its high wear resistance

Stainless steels in general are prone to cold welding or galling when rubbed together under stress. The typical situation occurs in the threads of a bolt and nut or tapped hole. This is due to local breakdown of the passive film on the surface of the steel. S21800 was specifically developed to combat this problem. It uses a combination of Mn, Si, Ni and N to produce a highly stable and adherent passive oxide film. The high wear resistance is also a key feature of the grade.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Fasteners, bridge pins, bridge bearings, valve stems, bearings, chain drives, impellers, wear rings, space research, surgical instruments.

 

#

23

F6NM 1.4313 S41500

   Offshore Oil and Gas

   Hydro-Electric Power

 

F6NM is a low–carbon martensitic stainless steel with corrosion resistance, good strength, good toughness and much better weldability than most martensitic grades of stainless steel.

Approximate Composition – 13% Cr, 4.0% Ni, 0.5% Mo ≤ 0.05% C (EN and ASTM standards vary in chemical composition).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Basic pitting and crevice corrosion resistance 

• Moderate sulphide stress cracking resistance

• Good yield strength (520 to 800 MPa minimum in EN standard depending on heat treatment)

• Better toughness than most martensitic grades 

• Good weldability compared to other martensitic grades. Still requires pre- and post-weld heat treatment

F6NM is martensitic grade of stainless steel with several important enhancements. The molybdenum addition gives an improved corrosion resistance. The low carbon gives much improved weldability and along with the nickel produces excellent toughness.  The dominant use of this grade is in the oil and gas industry.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Valve bodies, flanges, valve seats, oil field equipment, hydro-electric turbine systems, pumps, chemical process plant, pressure die casting.

 

#

24

1.4835 S30815

   Exhaust Manifold 

                                                      

 Radiant Tubes  

 

1.4835, often known by its Outokumpu brand name of 253MA, is a heat-resistant austenitic stainless steel. It is designed to have similar heat resistance to 310 but with higher creep strength due to strengthening with nitrogen.

Approximate Composition – 21% Cr, 1.7% Si, 11.0% Ni, 0.15% N plus Ce (cerium). (EN and ASTM standards vary in chemical composition).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Oxidation resistance better than grade 310 particularly in cyclic conditions at lower cost due to reduced nickel content

• Higher creep strength than 310 at typical operating temperatures (850-1150°C) allowing thinner sections

• Low susceptibility to brittle sigma phase formation

• Good weldability

The high temperature resistance of 253MA derives from its combination of chromium, silicon, nickel and cerium. In particular, the combination of cerium and silicon provides a tightly adherent oxide film. Nitrogen is used to balance the austenitic microstructure allowing a reduction in nickel content and therefore cost compared to the standard heat resistant grade 310. As an example of the higher creep strength, it is 2.5 times higher than 310 at 900°C.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Heat exchangers, furnaces, glass making, fans, flame tubes, refractory anchors, heat treatment trays, incinerators, exhaust manifolds.

 

#

25

12% CrMoV 1.4923 (typical grade)

   Oil Refining

   Power Generation

 

“12 Chrome Moly Van” steels are a series of martensitic stainless steels designed for use at moderately high temperatures. 1.4923 is a typical grade in this series. The dominant application is steam power generating plant.

Approximate Composition – 12% Cr, 0.5% Ni, 1.0% Mo, 0.30% V(vanadium), 0.20% C (approximate EN composition, no comparable ASTM grade).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Moderate strength – 800 MPa UTS, 600 MPa 0.2% PS at room temperature

• Moderate high temperature strength – 280 MPa 0.2% PS at 550°C

• Good creep strength – 137 MPa rupture stress at 550°C  at 100000 hours

• Moderate toughness – typically 50 J at room temperature 

• Basic corrosion resistance

• Weldable with care. Requires pre and post weld heat treatment

The 12% CrMoV series of steels can be regarded as a development of the original Harry Brearley cutlery grade. By adding nickel, molybdenum and vanadium to the basic 12% Cr grade, the strength is improved especially at high temperature. The key property is creep strength. Creep is the phenomenon where a material continues to deform with time under stress. For steels it is important to take account of creep above about 450°C. Typical steam temperatures for power generation are approximately 550°C which explains the extensive use of these grades in this application sector. Further enhancements of the 12% CrMoV grades have been developed with additions of tungsten, cobalt, niobium and nitrogen. These have often been known by brand names such as FV 448, FV 535, Jethete M152.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Pressure equipment, high temperature bolting, steam turbines, nuclear reactors, gas turbines, petroleum refining.

 

#

26

A286/660 1.4980 S66286

   Gas Turbine Parts

   Jet Engine Parts

 

A286 is an austenitic precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel. It has excellent creep strength and can be used at higher temperatures (up to 700°C) than the 12% CrMoV martensitic stainless steels.

Approximate Composition – 15% Cr, 25.0% Ni, 1.3% Mo, 0.30% V, 0.05% C, 2.0% Ti, 0.15% Al (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Moderate strength – 900 MPa UTS, 600 MPa 0.2% PS at room temperature

• Excellent high temperature strength – 460 MPa 0.2% PS at 550°C, 380 MPa at 650°C

• Excellent creep strength – 415 MPa rupture stress at 550°C  at 100000 hours, 132 MPa at 650°C

• Good toughness due to austenitic structure, even at cryogenic temperatures

• Good corrosion resistance

• Very low magnetic permeability

• Weldable with care. 

A286 is a metallurgically complex stainless steel. Its main purpose is to provide high temperature creep strength. Creep is time dependent deformation at elevated temperatures. It does this using a precipitation hardening mechanism involving a compound of nickel, titanium and aluminium. This compound is formed in tiny particles by solution annealing at 980°C followed by an ageing treatment at about 720°C. It is these particles which impart the very high strength to this grade. Although not primarily designed for use at low temperatures, the combination of high strength, good toughness and non-magnetic properties make it a candidate for cryogenic applications.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Pressure equipment, high temperature bolting, steam turbines, nuclear reactors, gas turbines, rocket engines, jet engines, exhaust systems, cryogenics.

 

#

27

1.4886 N08330

   Metals Processing

   Radiant Tubes

 

1.4886, often known by its Rolled Alloys brand name RA330®, is a high temperature austenitic stainless steel with superior performance to standard grades such as 310.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr, 35.0% Ni, Si 1.25%, 0.05% C (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Excellent oxidation resistance up to 1150°C

• Excellent carburisation resistance up to 1150°C

• Excellent thermal shock resistance

• Good resistance to oxidising sulphur atmospheres

• Excellent resistance to sigma phase formation

• Excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance

• Good weldability

This grade is regarded as one the best all-round high temperature stainless steels due to its chromium and high nickel content. Indeed, it is classed as a nickel alloy in the UNS system. The addition of silicon gives it carburisation resistance. Its fully austenitic structure and the absence of elements such as molybdenum give it a high resistance to forming embrittling sigma phase.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Muffles, retorts, heat treatment baskets, refractory fixings, salt pots, radiant tubes, conveyors, furnace fans.

 

#

28

1.4418

  Cement Plant

  Hydrofoil Legs

 

1.4418 is a martensitic stainless steel with enhanced corrosion resistance and weldability.

Approximate Composition – 16% Cr, 1.0% Mo, 5.0% Ni, 0.04% C (EN composition range. No ASTM equivalent).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Best pitting corrosion resistance of all martensitic stainless steel grades approaching that of 304

• Good strength. 700 MPa 0.2%PS, 900 MPa UTS at room temperature

• Excellent toughness, 80 J at room temperature. 40 J at -20°C

• Good weldability, especially for a martensitic stainless steel. No preheating required. Post weld tempering recommended

• Good wet abrasion resistance

This grade is designed to achieve a good balance of corrosion resistant and mechanical properties. The chromium and molybdenum provides corrosion resistance. The low carbon and increased nickel content provides a high strength martensitic structure but with good toughness. There are also significant amounts of austenite and ferrite in the steel. This structure also gives a much improved weldability compared to normal higher carbon martensitic grades. It is proving to be a replacement for grade 431 (1.4057) in some applications.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Mining, cement plants, hydrofoil legs, anti-seismic applications, helicopter landing grids, penstocks, hydroelectric turbine blades, hardboard and chipboard press plate, propeller shafting, pulp and paper.

 

 

#

29

420MoV 1.4116 X50CrMoV15 

  Knives

   EN Name Used for Marketing

 

X50CrMoV15 is a high hardness martensitic stainless steel. In strip form, its dominant use is for high quality knife blades. This is a rare, possibly a unique, example of the EN Name of a stainless steel grade being used for marketing purposes.

Approximate Composition – 15% Cr, 0.7% Mo, 0.15% V, 0.50% C (EN composition range. No ASTM equivalent).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Very high hardness – Up to 56 Rockwell C

• Retention of blade sharpness

• Moderate corrosion resistance better than standard 12% martensitic grades

• Poor weldability

X50CrMoV15 uses the moderately high carbon content of 0.50% to develop a high hardness martensitic microstructure. The higher chromium plus small molybdenum addition gives a greater corrosion resistance than standard martensitic grades. Vanadium allows higher tempering temperatures to be used and gives greater toughness.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

High quality knives, cutting tools.

 

#

30

 

        1.4828828 

   Lamborghini Exhaust System

    Heat Treatment Furnace

 

1.4828 is a heat resistant austenitic stainless steel. It has improved oxidation resistance, carburisation resistance and high temperature strength compared to standard grades like 304.

Approximate Composition – 20% Cr, 12.0% Ni, Si 2.0%, 0.10% C (EN composition range. No ASTM equivalent).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good oxidation resistance up to 1000°C

• Good carburisation resistance up to 1000°C

• Good thermal shock resistance

• Good weldability

This grade can be regarded as a development of standard grade 304. Its increased chromium and nickel give it better oxidation resistance whilst silicon gives improved carburisation resistance. It is sometimes said to be equivalent to grade 309 but in fact, 309 has a higher Cr content and no Si. The relatively high carbon content gives strength at high temperatures.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

High end car exhaust systems, heating elements, furnace components, burners, gas flare heads.

 

#

31

440A/440B/440C 1.4109/1.4112/1.4125 S44002/S44003/S44004

  Bearings

Knife Blade

 

The 440 grades form a series of high carbon martensitic stainless steels. They have basic corrosion resistance and extremely high hardness and wear resistance.

Approximate Composition – 16% Cr, 0.60-1.0% C plus Mo and V in EN grades (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards. Equivalents much looser than for most grades).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Basic corrosion resistance. Lower than other martensitic grades like 431

• Very high hardness increasing with carbon content. 440C capable of 60 Rockwell HRC (~700 HV)

• Very high strength up to 2000 MPa UTS, 1900 MPa 0.2% PS

• Low elongation 4%

• Low toughness 10J

• Very high wear resistance

• Difficult to weld

• Difficult to machine

This series of grades give the highest level of strength/hardness in any martensitic stainless steel. Consequently, they are used where a basic level of corrosion resistance is required coupled with high wear resistance or blade sharpness. They are usually supplied in the annealed condition for improved machinability and then hardened and tempered to develop the high hardness.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Bearings, valves, knife blades, surgical instruments, tools, moulds, dies.

 

#

32

FV520B 1.4594 S45000 S143/4/5 aerospace grades

  Lifting Attachment Nuclear Transport Flask     

         Pump Shaft

FV520B is a martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel. It is similar to the more common PH grade 17-4PH. It combines moderate corrosion resistance with high strength and moderate toughness.

Approximate Composition – 14% Cr, 5%Ni, 1.5% Mo, 1.5% Cu, 0.05% C plus Nb (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards. UNS S45000 is a near equivalent).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Moderate corrosion resistance, better than standard martensitic grades. Can be better than 17-4 PH depending on environment

• Controlled balance of mechanical properties by ageing (precipitation hardening)

• High 0.2% proof strength from 720 MPa minimum to 1030 MPa minimum dependent on heat treatment condition

• Moderate toughness – 40 Joules minimum in lowest heat treatment condition even at moderately low sub-zero temperatures –70°C

• Weldable with matching consumables

• Difficult to machine

FV 520B, like 17-4 PH, develops its high strength from the precipitation of copper particles in its martensitic matrix. The supply of this grade is complicated by the mismatch between the “traditional” heat treatment conditions and those laid down in the EN standard. The aerospace standards S143/144/145 are closer to established heat treatments. The combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance finds uses in:

Pump shafts, impellers, fasteners, fans, valves, hydraulic equipment, turbine blades, aerospace, nuclear transport flask, medical devices.

 

#

33

17-7PH 1.4568 S17700

Poly Wave Compression Disc Spring

Pressure Transducers

 

17-7 PH is a precipitation hardening semi-austenitic stainless steel. It is able to develop a very high strength due to the strengthening of aluminium particles. It is usually found in strip or wire form for spring applications.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 7%Ni, 0.05% C, 1.0% Al (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good corrosion resistance better than 17-4 PH close to that of 304

• Very high strength up to 1700 MPa minimum UTS in EN 10151 or 1655 MPa minimum in ASTM A693

• Excellent fatigue strength

• Low distortion in heat treatment

• Weldable with matching consumables

17-7 PH provides a combination of very high strength and moderate corrosion resistance. Its metallurgy is complex involving several stages of processing to develop the necessary microstructure. The highest level of strength is achieved by cold working to produce martensite followed by an ageing treatment at about 480°C. This restricts the use of the grade to thin sheet and wire products. Other heat treatment conditions are also available to produce softer and more ductile material.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Springs, Belleville washers, aerospace, orthodontic wire, strain gauge, load cell, pressure transducer.

 

#

34

304Cu (302HQ) 1.4567 S30430

    Cold Headed Fasteners

    Double Glazing Securing Pins

 

304Cu is based on the familiar grade 304 with a significant addition of copper. This reduces the work hardening of the steel to allow operations such as cold heading, thread rolling and improved machining.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr, 9%Ni, 3.5% Cu, 0.03% C(Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good corrosion resistance similar to 304. Better than 304 in sulphuric acid due to copper addition

• Reduced work hardening allowing cold heading and thread rolling

• Resistance to becoming magnetic during cold working

• Easier machining than 304 due to lower work hardening. Approximately 25% improvement

304Cu is one of several grades that falls into the fastener grade A2. A2 is often thought of as equivalent to 304. However A2 has a maximum Cu of 4% which allows 304Cu to be included. 

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Fasteners, intricate machined components, automotive industry, electronics, chemical processing, food and drink.

 

#

35

Stabilised Ferritics 439 441 445 460LI

  Sugar Evaporators

     Lift                        

 

A series of grades which compete with 304/304L in corrosion resistance. The absence of nickel produces a lower cost alternative. The ferritic structure gives excellent deep drawability and stress corrosion cracking resistance but disadvantages in welding of thick sections and stretch forming.

Equivalent EN and UNS grade designations: 1.4510 1.4509 1.4621 1.4622 1.4611 S43035 S43940 S44500

Approximate Composition – 17-21% Cr plus combinations of stabilising elements like Ti and Nb (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Good pitting corrosion resistance similar to 304

• Excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking, better than standard austenitic grades 304 and 316

• Excellent deep drawing properties, slightly better than austenitic grades

• Reduction in ridging and roping during forming compared to unstabilised ferritic grades like 430

• Lower thermal expansion and higher thermal conductivity than austenitic grades

• Limited stretch formability compared to austenitic grades due to lower ductility

• Limit on welding to about 5 mm due to poor weld toughness from rapid grain growth

• Loss of toughness at sub-zero temperatures

This series of grades has been used extensively over the years for a number of familiar applications such as exhaust systems and washing machine tubs. They are being targeted at competing with 304 in applications where the limitations on weld thickness are not an issue. The stainless steel mills are frequently introducing new grades of this type so it is worth checking for an up to date list of available grades.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Exhaust systems, washing machine tubs, cladding, wall panels, roofing, handrails, catering equipment, water tubing, sugar processing, fuel cells, portable pizza ovens, lifts.

 

#

36

Stabilised Ferritics with Mo 436 444 470LI

    St Lawrence Church, Doncaster

                                              

          Uffingham Church

                                                    

Grades which compete with 316/316L in corrosion resistance. The absence of nickel produces a lower cost alternative. The ferritic structure gives excellent deep drawability and stress corrosion cracking resistance but disadvantages in welding of thick sections and stretch forming.

Equivalent EN and UNS Grades - 1.4526 1.4521 1.4613 S43600 S44400

Approximate Composition – 17-20% Cr, 1.0-2.0% Mo, plus combinations of stabilising elements like Ti and Nb.  470LI uses 24% Cr instead of Mo additions to achieve comparable corrosion resistance to 316. (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Good corrosion resistance similar to or just below that of 316

• Excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking better than standard austenitic grades 304 and 316

• Higher 0.2% PS compared to 316. 280/300 MPa compared to 240 MPa

• Excellent deep drawing properties slightly better than austenitic grades

• Reduction in ridging and roping during forming compared to unstabilised ferritic grades like 430

• Lower thermal expansion and higher thermal conductivity than austenitic grades

• Limited stretch formability compared to austenitic grades due to lower ductility

• Limit on welding to about 5 mm due to poor weld toughness from rapid grain growth

• Loss of toughness at sub-zero temperatures

These grades have been used extensively over the years for a number of familiar applications such as exhaust systems. They are being targeted at competing with 316 in applications where the limitations on weld thickness and stretch forming are not an issue. 

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Cladding, wall panels, exhaust systems, roofing, handrails, catering equipment, domestic plumbing, hot water tanks, sugar processing, electrical motor housings.

 

#

37

305 1.4303 S30500

Fuel Filter       

           Pen

 

305 is essentially a high nickel version of 304. Its high nickel content reduces the work hardening of the grade and imparts much improved deep drawing properties.

Approximate Composition – 17.5% Cr 11.0% Ni (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grades combines the following characteristics:

• Good corrosion resistance similar to that of 304

• Excellent deep drawing, spinning and cold heading properties compared to 304

• Highly non-magnetic and resistant to martensitic transformation with cold work

The dominant application for this grade is highly deep drawn components. This can often be achieved in one stage without intermediate annealing.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Deep drawn components, pen barrels, automatic eyelet machines, electrical components, cold headed fasteners, automotive components

 

#

38

Stabilised Austenitics with Mo 316Ti/316Cb 1.4571/1.4580 S31635/S31640

   Heat Exchangers

                                            

   A380 Airbus

                                            

The stabilised austenitic grades 316Ti and 316Cb are similar to 316 but with Ti or Nb to improve intergranular corrosion resistance. They also have superior high temperature mechanical properties compared to 316/316L.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr, 11% Ni, 2% Mo plus Ti (titanium) or Nb (niobium). (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grades combines the following characteristics:

• Similar pitting corrosion resistance to 316L

• Intergranular corrosion resistance equal to 316L

• Improved high temperature 0.2% proof strength compared to 316L. 11% higher at 100°C, 30% higher at 550°C

• Improved creep strength compared to 316L

• Weldability equal to 316L

• Difficult to achieve good polished finish due to Ti or Nb carbides in the microstructure

In the early phase of the development of austenitic stainless steels like 316, the carbon content was high around 0.1%. On welding, it was found that the chromium reacted with the carbon to produce chromium carbide. This removes chromium from the matrix of the steel and effectively weakens the passive film near to the weld leading to corrosion, known as “weld decay”. It was found that adding titanium (316Ti) or niobium (316Cb) solved this problem by preferentially combining with the carbon leaving the chromium to do its job of forming the passive layer. With the advent of low cost steelmaking processes like AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) and VOD (vacuum oxygen decarburisation), low carbon grades like 316L, with a maximum carbon content of 0.030%, have virtually eliminated intergranular corrosion. 316Ti and 316Cb are now mainly used for their improved high temperature properties compared to 316L.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Heat exchangers, process plant, power generation, aerospace.

 

#

39

316L plus Mo 317L 316LN 317LMN 1.4432/1.4435/1.4438/1.4429/1.4439

   316LN Nuclear Fusion Research

   Pulp and Paper Plant

 

Taking 316L (1.4404) as a basis, it is possible to construct a series of grades by adding molybdenum and nitrogen for increased corrosion resistance and nickel for achieving the correct austenitic balance. Other properties, notably magnetic permeability are also affected.

Approximate Compositions:

EN Grade

Common Grade

UNS

C

Cr

Mo

Ni

N

1.4404

316L

S31603

0.030

17.0

2.0

10.0

0.04

1.4432

316L+Mo

S31603

0.030

17.0

2.5

10.5

0.04

1.4435

316L+Mo+Ni

S31603

0.030

17.5

2.5

13.0

0.04

1.4429

316LN

S31653

0.030

17.0

2.5

11.0

0.15

1.4438

317L

S31703

0.030

18.0

3.0

13.0

0.04

1.4439

317LMN

S31726

0.030

17.0

4.0

13.0

0.15

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Increasing pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. PREN up to 34 for 1.4439

• Increasing stress corrosion cracking resistance

• Increasing strength due to increased alloy content especially nitrogen. 0.2% PS of 290 MPa for 1.4439 compared to 240 MPa for 1.4404

• High nitrogen grades like 1.4429 have very low magnetic permeability

• Increasing tendency for sigma phase formation at elevated temperatures

• Increasing difficulty in hot and cold rolling

• Increased difficulty in forming

• Increasing care required in welding

These grades show the significant effect of adding molybdenum and nitrogen to increase the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels. This effect is measured by the pitting resistance equivalent (PREN):

PREN = %Cr + 3.3x%Mo + 16x%N

This series of grades spans a range of 23-34 from 1.4404 to 1.4439. The top end is about the same as the 2205 duplex grade 1.4462.

As the Cr and Mo contents increase, the Ni content has to increase to maintain the correct amount of austenite in the steel. In one special case, the grade 1.4435 has an even higher nickel content than the minimum specified at about 14%. This guarantees a maximum ferrite content of 0.5% which is vital in certain chemical and pharmaceutical processes.

The increased alloy content, in particular nitrogen, reduces the tendency for magnetic martensite to form on cold working and/or sub-zero temperatures. Grades such as 1.4429 are therefore used for low magnetic permeability applications notably in nuclear fusion research.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Chemical, pharmaceutical, oil and gas, nuclear fusion, cryogenics, surgical implants.

 

#

40

Austenitic H grades 304H 316H 321H 1.4948 1.4919 1.4941 S30409 S31609 S32109

  High Temperature Seal

   Expansion Joint

 

The H grade versions of familiar grades like 304, 316 and 321 have a minimum carbon content to produce increased high temperature strength, particularly creep strength.  They must also meet a minimum grain size.

Approximate Compositions: As 304, 316 and 321 but with 0.04-0.08% C (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

Compared to 304, 316 and 321 these grades combine the following characteristics:

• Similar general corrosion resistance

• Reduced intergranular corrosion resistance

• Improved high temperature 0.2% proof strength 

• Improved creep strength 

Carbon is an important element in stainless steels. It is usually kept low in order to aid weldability, especially in the avoidance of chromium carbide, which gives rise to intergranular corrosion. However, carbon is an important strengthening element. In certain cases, notably at high temperature, strength may take precedence over the risk of intergranular corrosion. The minimum carbon level of 0.04% in the H grades provides this extra strength. Creep strength is enhanced with a large grain size. Therefore, it is usual for standards to specify an ASTM grain size of 7 or coarser for the H grades. H grades are now something of a rarity in general stockholders.

Applications which illustrate these features include:

Heat exchangers, gas boilers, aerospace, exhaust systems, process plant, element tubing, power generation, rocket engine parts, seals, expansion joints.

 

#

41

309 1.4833 S30908

 Nuclear Waste Flask      Courtesy of Outokumpu

   Glass Blowing Equipment

 

309 is a heat resisting stainless steel, lying somewhere between 304 and 310 in the heat resisting spectrum. It is also used as a welding electrode for welding austenitic stainless steel to carbon steel.

Approximate Composition: 23% Cr 13% Ni (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good oxidation resistance up to 1000°C

• Good resistance to sulphurous atmospheres

• Moderate carburising resistance

• Welding consumable for joining stainless steel to carbon steel 

Chromium is an important element in determining the heat resistance of stainless steel. With 23% Cr, 309 is significantly better than 304 with only 18% Cr.  The nickel content of 13% means that the steel contains a significant amount of ferrite. The comparatively low nickel content makes it better than 310 (20% Ni) for resistance to reducing sulphur-bearing atmospheres.

Its second, quite different application as 309L, is as a welding consumable for joining grades like 304L to carbon steel. The dilution of the 23% Cr 13% Ni composition by the mild steel still gives a satisfactory metallurgical structure quite close to that of grade 304L. It is also routinely used for welding the low Cr ferritic grade 1.4003 to ensure toughness in the weld.

Applications include:

Annealing covers, waste incinerators, glass blowing equipment, nuclear transport flasks, rotary kilns, calciners, furnace anchor bolts.

 

#

42

SiCromAl 1.4713 1.4724 1.4742 1.4762

   Molten Metal Processing

   Heat Treatment Basket

 

SiCromAl grades are a series of ferritic heat resisting stainless steels with varying amounts of silicon, chromium and aluminium. They are useful for temperatures up to 1150°C depending on grade.

Approximate Composition:

EN Grade

Common Grade

C

Si

Cr

Al

1.4713

SiCromAl 8

0.08

0.8

6.5

0.8

1.4724

SiCromAl 9

0.08

1.0

13.5

1.0

1.4742

SiCromAl 10

0.08

1.3

18

1.0

1.4762

SiCromAl 12

0.08

1.4

24

1.5

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good oxidation resistance up to 1150°C for highest grade 1.4762

• Good resistance to sulphidation 

• Good resistance to molten metals

• Moderate carburisation resistance

• Greater resistance to thermal shock than austenitic grades

• Can be prone to 475°C embrittlement and sigma phase in some grades

• Loss of toughness above 900°C due to grain coarsening of fully ferritic structure

• Much lower creep strength than austenitic grades

• Poorer weldability than austenitic grades

This series of grades depends on the combined effects of chromium, silicon and aluminium. All of these metals give benefits to the passive oxide layer on the surface of the steel: chromium and aluminium - resistance to oxidation, silicon – resistance to oxidation and carburisation. The absence of nickel leads to better sulphidation resistance than austenitic grades. The lower thermal expansion and higher thermal conductivity compared to austenitic grades makes them more resistant to thermal shock.

Applications include:

Heat exchangers, furnaces, molten metal baths, high temperature nozzles, heat treatment boxes.

 

 

#

43

416 1.4005 S41600

   Precision Machined Components

   Precision Machined Components

 

416 is the most common “free-machining” martensitic grade using sulphur to produce sulphides allowing easier chip-breaking during machining.

Approximate Composition - 12% Cr, 0.10% C, 0.25/0.35% S (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Basic corrosion resistance lower than grade 410 due to sulphur

• Moderate strength and toughness

• Excellent machinability index approximately 90 compared to 100 for free cutting mild steel

416 is the preferred free machining grade where higher strength than 303 is required. It is essentially grade 410 (1.4006) with sulphur for free machining. It is ideal for high throughput, intricate components.

Applications include:

Shafts, axles, gears, valves, fasteners, sensors, precision machined components, gun barrels, washing machine parts, dowel pins, clamps, collars.

 

#

44

1.4122

   Retaining Ring

   Drive Shafts

 

1.4122 is a martensitic grade with enhanced corrosion resistance, comparable to that of ferritic grade 430 and somewhat better than the basic martensitic grades such as 410, 420 and 431.

Approximate Composition - 16% Cr, 0.35% C, 1.0% Mo (EN standard only. No equivalent ASTM grade).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Moderate corrosion resistance, better than 410, 420 and 431 

• Good strength, 550 MPa minimum 0.2% PS coupled with basic toughness 20 J Charpy impact test

• Good wear resistance

• Not easily welded due to its high carbon content

1.4122 offers the high strength of a martensitic grade combined with enhanced corrosion resistance due to its higher Cr and Mo addition.

Applications include:

Automotive, pump shafts, drive shafts, food processing, mechanical engineering, cutting tools, construction, control valves, freshwater boat shafts, retaining rings.

 

#

45

Hyperduplex (S32707, S33207)

   Deep Water Umbilical

   Heat Exchanger

 

Hyperduplex  grades offer significantly improved resistance to pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and increased strength compared to super duplex grades.

Approximate Composition - 27-32% Cr, < 0.030% C, 7.0% Ni, 3.5-5% Mo, 0.4-0.5% N

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Excellent resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion – PREN ~50 

• Excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance in chloride and sulphide

• Minimum 0.2% PS 700-800 MPa

These grades are used in extreme sea water conditions e.g. high temperatures and high chlorination levels.

Applications include:

Offshore oil and gas e.g. deep water umbilicals, desalination plants, heat exchangers, process industries.

 

#

46

301LN 1.4318 S30153

   Rail Carriage

   Wheel Covers

 

301LN is an austenitic stainless steel with a high work hardening rate. Nitrogen is used to provide increased strength.

Approximate Composition - 17.0% Cr, 0.030% C, 7.0% Ni, 0.12% N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Corrosion resistance similar to 304

• Higher minimum 0.2% PS proof stress compared to 304 – 350 MPa

• Work hardening allows minimum UTS of 1150 MPa defined in EN 10088-2

• Good toughness

• Higher strength and work hardening requires larger forces in forming

• Greater springback than 304

The dominant use of this high strength austenitic grade is in railway carriages. The high strength allows the use of thinner sections and therefore lower weight which in turn gives more economical running costs. The high toughness offers excellent crash resistance.

Applications include:

Rail carriages, springs, airframe sections, wiper blades, automotive wheel covers.

 

#

47

310 MoLN 1.4466 S31050

   Urea Plant

   Pulp and Paper Plant

 

310 MoLN is a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel grade. It is based on 310 with additions of molybdenum and nitrogen and a lower carbon content. In contrast to 310, which is used for heat resistance, it is used for its corrosion resistance especially in the production of urea.

Approximate Composition - 25% Cr, 22% Ni, 2.0% Mo, < 0.030% C, 0.12% N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Excellent resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion – typical PREN 34

• Excellent resistance to ammonium carbamate, an intermediate compound in urea production

• Slightly higher 0.2% PS compared to standard austenitic grades due to high alloy content especially nitrogen – 255 MPa minimum

• Fully austenitic structure (< 0.5% ferrite) requires care in welding to avoid hot cracking.

This grade is an example of a development aimed at a specific chemical production process, namely urea. Its high level corrosion resistance (PREN ~34) allows it to be used in other highly corrosive environments.

Applications include:

Urea production, pulp and paper, flue gas desulphurisation.

 

#

48

304 Boronated S30460-S30467

   Nuclear Glove Box

   Nuclear Transport Flask

 

This is a series of steels with increasing levels of boron 0.20/0.29% to 1.75/2.25%. It is used entirely in the nuclear industry for neutron absorption.

Approximate Composition - 18% Cr, 12% Ni, 0.20/0.29% to 1.75/2.25% B (Grades found only in ASTM standard A887).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Excellent levels of neutron absorption preventing criticality of nuclear reactions

• Moderate corrosion resistance lower than grade 304 but acceptable in typical nuclear environments

• Reduced impact toughness due to formation of borides

• Formable with care – increased bending radius compared to 304

• Weldable with care – boron containing consumables

• Increased levels of tool wear in machining

• Higher levels of boron facilitated by powder metallurgy due to loss of hot ductility in conventional melting plus hot rolling

Applications include:

Nuclear transport flasks, nuclear storage, nuclear reactor shielding.

 

#

49

446 1.4749 S44600

   Float Glass Production

   Copper Processing

 

446 is a ferritic heat resisting steel useful up to 1100°C.

Approximate Composition – 26% Cr, 0.15% C, 0.2% N (Exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

• Good oxidation resistance

• Excellent resistance to sulphidation particularly in reducing conditions. Much better than austenitic heat resisting grades due to absence of nickel

• Good resistance to molten copper, lead and tin

• Poor high temperature strength

• Weldable with austenitic electrodes

Applications include:

Glass making (float glass), metallurgical plant (copper processing), burners, annealing boxes, kiln linings, thermocouple tubes, injection nozzles

 

#

50

Calcium Treated Grades

   Machined Stainless Steel Components

   Machining Stainless Steel

 

Calcium is used to improve the machinability of many stainless steel grades without significantly affecting corrosion resistance.

These grades combine the following characteristics:

• Improved machinability compared to normal grade. 10-50% improvement in productivity depending on grade and component

• Can be applied to austenitic, martensitic and PH grades, for example 304, 316, 420, 431, 17-4 PH

• No significant effect on corrosion resistance (unlike conventional free-cutting, high sulphur grades)

One of the major disadvantages for all stainless steels compared to carbon and alloy steels is their machinability. This is particularly true for the austenitic type where the high work hardening rate leads to difficulty in producing chips during machining. Machining rates are lower and tool wear is higher than for carbon and alloy steels. High levels of sulphur can be used to improve machinability in grades like 303 and 416. However, this reduces the corrosion resistance and weldability. Calcium treated steels contain a sulphur level at the higher end of the range for the normal grade, typically 0.015/0.030%. Calcium at very low levels < 0.001% produces modified non-metallic inclusions in the steel matrix which make it easier to produce chips in machining and lowers tool wear. The treatment is mostly applied to bar products but can also be applied to plate. Stainless steel mills typically use brand names to promote the improved machinability, for example IMCO, MAXIVAL, ROLDAMAX, PRODEC and UGIMA,

Applications include:

All sectors where machined components are used.

 

Grade 316

Grade 316 (1.4401) is the second in this series of articles about stainless steel grades. It is the most common grade which highlights the benefits of molybdenum (Mo).

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr 10% Ni 2% Mo (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

Mo enhances the corrosion resistance of stainless steel even in relatively small amounts. 1% of Mo is worth about 3% of Cr in terms of corrosion resistance.

In environments where 304 (1.4301) is found to be inadequate, 316 (1.4401) is the natural first grade to be considered. Typical environments where 316 (1.4401) is used are high chloride (saline, coastal), heavy urban, acidic, high temperature solutions. Like all austenitic stainless steels, 316 (1.4401) has good welding and forming characteristics.

Typical applications which demonstrate the improved corrosion resistance of 316(1.4401) include:

Pharmaceutical plant, chemical processing, offshore oil and gas platform topside equipment, architectural applications in urban and coastal conditions, food processing, water treatment, pressure vessels, transport containers, swimming pool fittings and fixtures, marine structures, yacht fittings, laboratory equipment, heat exchangers.

316 (1.4401) will continue to be an important grade of stainless steel in the more demanding applications for many years to come.

What should the first grade be?

Not surprisingly, 304 (1.4301) and its variants are the most common grades in the SSAS database. This reflects the market as a whole.

Approximate Composition – 18% Cr 8% Ni (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

Good corrosion resistance

Good weldability

Excellent ductility giving stretch formability in pressings

Hygienic surfaces

Work hardening for spring properties

Ease of manufacture at the steel mill

This combination of properties leads to the grade being used for a wide range of applications including:

Sinks, pots and pans, catering surfaces, architectural cladding, handrails, food processing, water treatment, pressure vessels, transport containers, surgical instruments, building support products, refrigeration equipment, watch cases, automotive trim, street furniture, anaerobic digestion, chemical plant, sanitaryware.

This is merely a sample of the applications for 304/304L (1.4301/1.4307). Despite the competition from grades with a similar corrosion resistance, this grade is likely to continue to form the backbone of the stainless steel market for some years to come.

Grade 430

Grade 430 (1.4016) is the most common ferritic stainless steel grade in sheet form.

Approximate Composition – 17% Cr (exact composition ranges vary between EN and ASTM standards).

This grade combines the following characteristics:

•    Fair corrosion resistance
•    Fair weldability (in thin sections)
•    Excellent deep drawing properties
•    Cost effectiveness due to absence of nickel
•    Hygienic surfaces
•    Magnetic
•    Thermal expansion comparable to carbon steel

Indoor conditions are usually compatible with the use of 430 (1.4016). Mild chemicals such as detergents and cleaning fluids are safe to use with this grade.

Typical applications include:

Washing machine drums, cutlery, kitchen utensils, catering equipment, microwave oven liners, kick plates, lifts, induction heated pots and pans, cooker hobs, air extraction units, automotive trim, hose clamps, window hinges. 430 (1.4016) is a cost-effective material in many mild environments and will continue to be so for many years.